Harry Potter: A History of Magic Opens at the New-York Historical Society

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Harry Potter: A History of Magic, the British Library’s most successful exhibition, opens at the New-York Historical Society on Friday, October 5. Celebrating the 20th anniversary of the U.S. publication of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, the New York exhibition explores the traditions of folklore and magic at the heart of the Harry Potter stories and showcases a new selection of objects that are on view to the public for the very first time.

Unique to the New York presentation of  the British Library’s Harry Potter: A History of Magic exhibition—and on public view for the first time—are Mary GrandPré’s pastel illustrations for the cover artwork of Scholastic’s original editions of the novels; Brian Selznick’s newly created artwork for the covers of the 20th anniversary edition of the Harry Potter series published by Scholastic; cover art by Kazu Kibuishi featured in Scholastic’s 15th anniversary box set; and the enormous steamer trunk used to transport a signed copy of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince on the Queen Mary to the U.S. The exhibition also includes costumes and set models from the award-winning play Harry Potter and the Cursed Child.

Also on display for the first time in the U.S. are Rowling’s handwritten first drafts of The Philosopher’s Stone and Deathly Hallows, her hand-drawn sketch of the Hogwarts grounds, and portraits and sketches of some of the Hogwarts’s professors and magical creatures created by British illustrator Jim Kay. John James Audubon’s watercolor of Snowy Owls, a 1693 publication defending the Salem witch trials, a study of the Woolworth Building—the landmark New York location featured in the film Fantastic Beasts—and other artifacts from New-York Historical’s collection round out the original offerings.

For more information and to purchase tickets, visit the exhibition website. Opened October 5, 2018 and runs through January 27, 2019.

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Queen Elizabeth I Letters donation

The British Library is pleased to announce the donation to its American Trust of 43 historically important letters, written by Queen Elizabeth I and senior courtiers, relating to the imprisonment of Mary, Queen of Scots.

Many of the letters were written to Sir Ralph Sadler, who was entrusted with the custody of Mary, Queen of Scots, at Tutbury Castle in Staffordshire, between 1584-85, just a few years before her execution for treason in 1587. They include four letters signed by Elizabeth I, and many others in the hands of her Chief Minister, Lord Burghley, and her Secretary of State, Sir Francis Walsingham.

The collection, which is of significant historical importance, has been on loan to the Library for a number of years. The letters have been gifted by industrialist and philanthropist Mark Pigott KBE to the American Trust for the British Library and will enhance the Library’s extensive collections of original correspondence of the Tudor monarchs.

For more details and photographs, read the British Library press release.

2018 at the British Library

The British Library revealed cultural highlights for 2018, including:

  • James Cook: The Voyages, a major exhibition marking 250 years since Captain James Cook set sail on three voyages that changed the world
  • Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms, a spectacular exhibition exploring the riches of Anglo-Saxon art and ideas over six centuries
  • The acquisition of Booker Prize-winning author Penelope Fitzgerald’s personal archive
  • A landmark exhibition commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Empire Windrush bringing hundreds of Caribbean migrants to their new home in the UK

More details in the press release.

Beloved Board Member Dies

LisavonClemm Headshot ATBL

It is with great sorrow that we mark the passing of our longtime Board member Lisa von Clemm. She passed away peacefully at home on March 3, 2016. Beloved widow of Michael, treasured mother of Stefanie and Charlotte, dearly loved mother-in-law of Will, and devoted and adored grandmother of Oliver, Louie, and Welles.

Her husband Michael served as Trustee of the ATBL first. Lisa then took up his service and was an enthusiastic host of ATBL cocktail parties and a tireless representative at the British Library. She will be missed.

London Memorial Service on Monday, June 27th, 2016 at 3pm
St. George’s Church, Aubrey Walk, London, W8 7JG

Wellesley Memorial Service on Thursday, July 28th, 2016 at 3pm
St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 79 Denton Road, Wellesley, MA 02482

ATBL Meets the Prince of Wales

David Redden, President,  Seana Anderson, Executive Director, and Trustees of the ATBL were invited to the opening of the Magna Carta Exhibition at the British Library on March 12, 2015.  David and Seana, as representatives of the ATBL, were presented to HRH Charles, the Prince of Wales, to receive acknowledgement of ATBL’s $56,000 in support of the Exhibition.  A video from Bill Clinton was played and thanks extended to The New York Public Library for its loan of Thomas Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence; and to The US National Archives for its loan of the Delaware copy of the US Bill of Rights, both displayed in the UK for the first time ever.

New Chairman’s Council Members

Lucy Adams

Lucy Adams

Lucy Adams

Lucy Adams is the widow of George Adams who served for many years as a trustee and secretary of the ATBL.  She acquired a B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College and went on to graduate school at Columbia University, achieving her M. Phil. with distinction in Medieval and Renaissance Art and Architecture. She taught briefly at Boston College, then entered the museum world. She trained the volunteers at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the American Museum of Natural History in New York, and initiated a volunteer program, when she and George lived in London, for the British Museum’s Education department.  While at the Met, Lucy worked with the curator of the Medieval Department and gave gallery talks. When she and George returned from London, she again worked at the Met, serving as a Contractual till 2011.

 

Ralph Brown

Ralph Brown

Ralph Brown

Ralph Brown is a retired corporate lawyer. Much of his legal career was spent in acquisitions work, including educational publishing companies. He is currently a Trustee of The New York Society Library.  He is also a Board member of The Correctional Association of New York and The Osborne Association, organizations involved in prison reform focused on improving conditions in prisons and helping those affected by the criminal justice system to rebuild positive lives.  His interests are broad ranging from the histories of ancient Greece and Rome; England and France in the sixteenth century; Russia in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; the American Civil War; and early 20th-century Europe and the United States.

 

Elizabeth Brown

Elizabeth Brown

Elizabeth Brown

Elizabeth A. R. Brown is Professor Emeritus of History at the City University of New York where she taught from 1963 to 1992.  She received her B.A. from Swarthmore College in 1954, her M.A. and Ph.D. from the Radcliffe Graduate School and Harvard in 1956 and 1961. She received the degree Doctor litterarum honoris causa from The Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies in Toronto in 2009.  She has taught at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris (1986), at Harvard University (1956-58, 1960-63), New York University (1994-95), and Yale University (1995-96).  She is a corresponding member of the Société nationale des antiquaires de France and the Société de l’histoire de France.  Among her publications are The Monarchy of Capetian France and Royal Ceremonial (1991), Politics and Institutions in Capetian France (1991), Customary Aids and Royal Finances in Capetian France: The Marriage Aid of Philip the Fair (1992), and Saint-Denis, la basilique (2001).

 

ATBL Mourns Loss of Advisory Member

ada louise huxtableAda Louise Huxtable, valued Advisory Council Member of the ATBL died on Monday in Manhattan. She was 91.

Louise Landman was born on March 14, 1921, to Leah Rosenthal Landman and Dr. Michael Louis Landman. She grew up in Manhattan in a Beaux-Arts apartment house, the St. Urban, at Central Park West and 89th Street.

Author and writer for the NY Times, She pioneered modern architectural criticism celebrating buildings that respected human dignity and civic history .

She lived in Manhattan and Marblehead, Mass.

She won the first Pulitzer Prize for distinguished criticism, in 1970. More recently, she was the architecture critic of The Wall Street Journal.

“Mrs. Huxtable invented a new profession,” a valedictory Times editorial said in 1981, just as she was leaving the newspaper, “and, quite simply, changed the way most of us see and think about man-made environments.