Lecture by Dr. Anthony Marx, CEO, NYPL

ATBL members and guests enjoyed our lecture by Dr. Anthony Marx, CEO, New York Public Library, on October 15, 2012 at the Grolier Club on “The Future of the New York Public Library.” Get prints and free downloads at www.kitkaplan.com/atbl

Tony Marks

Dr. Tony Marks of the New York Public Library

David Redden, Anthony Marx and Lansing Lamont

David Redden, Anthony Marx and Lansing Lamont

Asia Mernissi and Jeannette Redden

Asia Mernissi and Jeannette Redden

Leah Delany and Selby Kiffer

Leah Delany and Selby Kiffer

Sarah Frankland and Dyke Benjamin

Sarah Frankland and Dyke Benjamin

Caroline Rubinstein and Phillip Winegar

Caroline Rubinstein and Phillip Winegar

Lea Iselin and Paula Jennings

Lea Iselin and Paula Jennings

Guest, Mary Schlosser, Stephen Dimen and  Frederick Pattison

Guest, Mary Schlosser, Stephen Dimen and
Frederick Pattison

Guests talk with Baroness Tessa Blackstone of the British Library.

William Dean and Lansing Lamont

William Dean and Lansing Lamont

Guest, David Redden and Anthony Marx

Guest, David Redden and Anthony Marx

Dr. Marks with Tessa Blackstone

Landmark Google Partnership

In June 2011 the British Library announced a significant partnership with Google. Google’s interest is to add as much new material to Google Book Search as possible, a mission which dovetails with the BL’s goal of digitizing as much of its collection as possible. Some 250,000 books, totalling around 40 million pages, will be digitized. This represents a small but significant part of BL’s historic printed books collection.

The actual digitization is scheduled to begin in the autumn of 2012, and the project is expected to last four years. By working with Google, the Library will benefit from their enormous presence and experience in the digital universe. Additionally, Google will bear the estimated £6 million costs of digitizing the material.

In undertaking this project, the BL furthers the aspirations of its nineteenth-century predecessors, so eloquently put forth by Antonio Panizzi, an Italian refugee who became head of the BL: “I want a poor student to have the same means of indulging his learned curiosity, of following his rational pursuits, of consulting the same authorities, of fathoming the most intricate inquiry as the richest man in the kingdom, as far as books go.” The BL is now using the latest digital technology to continue the mission for a new generation in the 21st century.

The Library has selected a range of materials dating from 1700 to 1870, for digitization. All selections will be out of copyright, and will be offered free at the point of use through both Google Book Search and the BL’s website. Because there already is so much English language material available on Google Book Search, the BL anticipates that a high proportion of the material will be in languages other than English. One of the early candidates will be its collection of works produced during the French Revolution. But there will also be Anglophone books. One example is An address to the people, on the present relative situations of England and France, written in 1799 by Robert Fellowes. This work comments from a decidedly non-revolutionary position on political reform in both England and France.

The Google partnership is a landmark in the BL’s digitization program. Wherever they are, researchers, students and other Library users, will be able to read these historical items with the freedom to share and re-purpose material for non-commercial use. This flexibility is going to be particularly important in exploring new types of research questions and computer-assisted methods. This partnership is an important chapter in the efforts to achieve the BL’s 2020 vision.
Adapted from an article by Kristian Jensen, Head of Arts and Humanities at the British Library.

ATBL Appoints New President

David Redden of Sotheby’s Assumes Top Post

David N. Redden

Lansing Lamont, David N. Redden, Dyke Benjamin

In his more than three decades at Sotheby’s David N. Redden, who on January 1 assumed the presidency of the American Trust for the British Library, has engaged in virtually every aspect of the high-end auction world.
He succeeds Lansing Lamont who held the post for ten years.

Mr. Redden has been responsible for some of the most creative and record-breaking auction at Sotheby’s where he is currently vice chairman for North and South America.
He came to the attention of the American Trust  through his friendship with the late William T. Golden. Mr. Redden had already achieved prominence by presiding over some of the most famous sales in Sotheby’s history.

He overseered the estate sales of Andy Warhol and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, disposed of Duchess of Windsor’s jewels, and the imperial Easter eggs from the Forbes Faberge’ Collection. He engineered the sales of ancient coins and shipwreck treasure; four battle flags of the American Revolution; the papers of Martin Luther King Jr.; and the most complete Tyrannosaurus Rex fossil  ever found.

More important to the bibliophilic world, Mr. Redden has sold Shakespeare First Folios; first printings of he Declaration of Independence; Washington’s own copy of the Federalist Papers; and the only privately owned copy of Magna Carta. Some years ago he presided over the disposal of the most valuable library ever sold in America, that of H. Bradley Martin, a prominent collector and member of the Phipps clan; the collection is noted for it’s impressive works on ornithology.

Mr. Redden  was born in China, the son of a U.S. diplomat and a New Zealand mother. His great-uncle was the English poet laureate, Alfred Austin, who in 1896 had succeeded Alfred, Lord Tennyson in the post. Mr. Redden was educated primarily in Europe.

He joined Sotheby’s in 1974 as a cataloger trainee in Chinese and Japanese artworks. Subsequently he was asked to manage wide range of auction areas including books and manuscripts, prints, photographs, Asian works of art, rare stamps and special sales.

Mr. Redden’s work has attracted over the years considerable media attention. He was subject of a half-hour documentary by the BBC, and was profiled by the New York Times.  In addition to his trustees role at the ATBL, he serves or has served on the boards of the Grolier Club, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Black Rock Forest Consortium, and Scenic Hudson.

Mr. Redden lives in New York City wit his wife Jeannette and their two children, Stephen and Clare. They have a home as well in Cornwall-on- Hudson, N.Y.